Good Management Practices for the Cane Sugar Industry


Pengarang : Jan Meyer,Peter Rein
Lokasi : Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Tahun : 2013


Deskripsi Buku



Nomor Panggil        : 633.61 Mey g

Kolasi                         : 608p.,ilustrs, appendix

In the literature dealing with tropical and sub tropical crops, sugarcane occupies a prominent ?are as it has played an important role in the his any of human civilizations. Today it is the stratep‘c economic sector in many developing economies there agricultural activities provide the best potential for labor absorption in rural areas. Unlike the arty years of regulated prices, sugarcane industries ammd the world are facing multiple challenges to the sustainability of production systems, because trade for global sugar has become more competitive as the production environment becomes less regu— This has led to a greater focus on improved goduction ef?ciencies by either improving yield output or reducing costs, or a combination of both options. The increased pressure and competition ?at water, nutrients and other resources and consequent increased risk of environmental impacts, nth as degradation in soil health, climate change ad atmospheric pollution, has led to increasing scrutiny from regulatory agencies, community and musumer groups into the environmental sustaindility of current sugarcane production systems. A number of sugar industries have pre-empted these pressures through the introduction of selfregulation monitoring schemes such as in Austra Ea (COMPASS evaluations, NSW Industry Code of Practice), Brazil (Jalles Machado ISO 14001), India .EID Parry, 2006), and South Africa (Standards and Guidelines for Conservation and Environmental Management and Susfarms, 2007). Brazil, which is the world’s larger producer of sugarcane with more than half of its production channeled into ethanol, has in recent years been very progressive with the moduction of environmental legislation and selfmonitoring schemes. The most recent of these is the UNICA ‘Green Protocol’ initiative launched in 2007. to accelerate the elimination of sugarcane burning and protect the environment through the implementation of soil conservation and water resource plans in the State of Sao Paulo. Concurrent with these developments are the International NGO efforts to promote market driven regulation for sugar and ethanol, including Bonsucro , formerly known as the Better Sugar Cane Initiative and Fair Trade International, while the Roundtable for Sustainable Biofuels was established to set standards for the production of biofuels from all crops. Bonsucro was launched to ?ll the need for an international set of sustainable sugar standards by which industries, companies and investors could establish their sugar purchasing principles. Customer and stakeholder demands, as channeled through these organizations, will become an important part of the future sugarcane value chain which will include the production of sugar, ethanol and power Although the literature on sugarcane husbandry and milling is extensive, only a few texts have dealt with the environmental and social impacts of the sugar industry and preferred good management practices to mitigate these impacts. The International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private sector arm of the World Bank and active investor in sugar industries worldwide, recognized the need for a comprehensive guide to Good Management Practices (GMP) in the cane sugar industry. In 2010, the IFC assembled a team of contributors, with a wide range of experience in sugarcane agriculture, environment, processing, social and economic ?elds, with access to strong technological support networks, to produce this much needed manual on good management practices. While the manual is primarily intended to provide guidelines on good management practices to agricultural, ?eld and mill managers of IFC-?nanced estates, it is also  envisaged that the manual would be shared with IFC sugarcane sponsors and potential clients to assist them to implement advantageous environmental, social and production practices. Agronomists, soil scientists, consultants, extension of?cers, sugar technologists, specialists in the ?elds of re— search, teaching or technical assistance and human resource personnel will also ?nd it a useful reference text. The 21 chapters in the book are divided into three sections, with 14 chapters covering agricultural management topics ranging from crop establishment to harvesting the crop, three chapters devoted to processing, co-product and ef?uent management topics and four chapters covering social, community and outgrower topics. Throughout the manual, authors have where possible, adopted the general theme of sustainability, to ensure that any good management practices that are recommend- ed, comply with the tenets of the triple bottom line: — Ensuring pro?table production and more ef?cient use of production resources. Minimizing or avoiding both on and off—site detrimental impacts on the environment Ensuring that production takes place in a socially equitable environment. ' Although the chapters can be read independently, the subject matter has been arranged to provide continuity of material with the environment and physiology and cultivars described in chapter 1, followed by the soil and its environment in chap ter 2 and then proceeding through the various ?eld operations from planting (chapter 3), weed control (chapter 4), fertilizing (chapter 5), irrigation and drainage (chapters 6 and 7), disease and pest control (chapters 8 and 9), ripeners (chapter 10), har— vesting and transport (chapter 11), agrochemicalsand farm safety (chapter 12), biomass management (chapter 13) and computer based decision support programs (chapter 14). Continuity of subject material is maintained in the processing section with the measurement of cane quality, cleaning of cane, water use and recycling, chemical and energy use and management of wastes and recycling. The third section deals with regulatory frameworks, human resource management, social welfare and community initiatives and a valuable review of outgrower development. The Appendices provide further details of selected ?eld good management practice guidelines as well as a cross reference guidance index, that links appropriate IF C and Bonsucro standards to each chapter. The manual ends with a detailed glossary of important technical terms as well as an explanation of abbreviations and symbols that have been used in the manual. In terms of agricultural practices a range of general texts are available covering sugarcane (e.g. Humbert R (1968), The Growing of Sugarcane, revised edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam; Blackburn F (1984) Sugarcane, Longman, New York; Bakker H (1999) Sugarcane Cultivation and Management, Kluver Academic, New York; and James G (2004) Sugarcane. 2nd edition, Blackwell Science, Oxford. Oliver Cheesman's (2004) book on Environmental Impacts of Sugar Production was a valuable starting-off point for our literature search on environmental impacts, and this was updated with information derived from CAB Direct. CAB Direct is a database of over eight million abstracts from the world's literature on agriculture and applied life sciences, based on material going back to 1973. Use was also made of other data bases, including the International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists, the South African Sugar Technologists’ Association, the Australian Society of Sugar Cane Technologists, and the American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists. Other valuable sources of information, such as the annual reports, bulletins, manuals and information sheets produced by various sugarcane research institutes such as CTC in Brazil, SASRI in South Africa and BSES in Australia, were scrutinized in the effort to present the latest and best scienti?c results and practices. References cited in the text are listed at the end of each chapter. Finally, where appropriate, examples of good

management practices, documented in a report prepared for the IFC and based on visits by the principal authors to some of the most highly productive and ef?cient mills in Brazil, Guatemala, Argentina, India, and Swaziland are referred to in various chapters, mostly in box format highlighted in a light blue color. Jan Meyer, May 2011


 



Buku Terkait


Tim Pengembangan Materi LPP
2013
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Business Information Focus
2017
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Siagian,Renville
2013
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Hermawan Sulistyo
2000
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Rama Prihandana
2005
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Sartono Kartodirdjo.
1991
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
R.H.V.Corley and P.B.Tinker
2016
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Peter Rein
2007
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Hari Subagio
2017
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
To'at Soemohandojo
2009
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Ir.Soejardi
2012
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Agus Supriono
2013
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Hardjosoepoetro,Sarjadi
2008
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Kementrian Negara Pendaya gunaan Aparatur Negara dan reformasi Birokarsi 2014
2014
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Toni Kuntohartono
1982
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Achmad Effendi
2009
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Hendroko,Roy
1988
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Shenkman,Michael
2010
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Harmawan,Rozi
2010
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Hadiman Joedo
1985
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Wahyudi,Teguh
2015
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Ir.Soejardi
1985
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Soedarsono Soemarno
2005
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Biro Data Indonesia
2012
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Biro Data Indonesia
2012
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Peter Rein
2017
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta
Perangin-Angin,Christian Orchard
2017
Perpustakaan LPP Yogyakarta